Carbonate Geology

KU's celebrated carbonates program continues to engage in cutting-edge research, draw the top carbonates students, and provide a world-class education in the discipline the program helped pioneer. With strong ties to industry, including the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium, KU's carbonates faculty provide extraordinary learning, research and financial opportunities.

The Faculty

Associate Professor David Fowle - Dr. Fowle works in the geobiology of carbonates, and microbial CO2 sequestration. He is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Professor Evan Franseen - Dr. Franseen's research primarily involves sedimentology, sequence stratigraphy, and diagenesis of carbonate and siliciclastic strata. His research approach is integrative and projects to date have utilized outcrop and subsurface data, high-resolution and conventional seismic methods, ground- penetrating radar, paleomagnetic methods, biostratigraphy, petrography, geochemical techniques, and computer modeling to better discern variables such as global, regional and local sea-level fluctuations, paleoceanographic conditions, climate, paleotopography, and autogenic processes that control carbonate depositional systems. Dr. Franseen is a Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Associate Dean and Haas Distinguished Professor Robert H. Goldstein - Dr. Goldstein’s research specialties include sequence stratigraphy of carbonates, diagenesis, and fluid-inclusion research.  Current research focuses on the following: (1) sea-level, paleotopographic, oceanographic, and climate controls on depositional sequence architecture of the Spanish Miocene; (2) modeling reservoir-analog architecture in deep-water and shallow water carbonates; (3) predicting porosity in reservoirs from new conceptual models of carbonate diagenesis; (4) effect of hydrothermal fluids on carbonate and sandstone reservoir rocks; (5) origin and distribution of early and late dolomite; (6) new fluid inclusion techniques for constraining thermal evolution of sedimentary systems; and (6) new fluid inclusion techniques for evaluating history of fluid composition.  Currently, he and his students are working on a variety of projects dealing with upstream fossil fuel energy supply including both conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources. Dr. Goldstein is a Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Department Chair and Professor Luis González - Dr. González is interested in stable isotope chemistry and its application to continental paleoclimatology, carbonate geochemistry with emphasis on isotopic and trace elemental chemistry, carbonate geology with emphasis on karst development and carbonate deposition in marine and karst systems, and carbonate diagenetic processes. Dr. González is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Professor Steve Hasiotis - Dr. Hasiotis works with trace fossils in carbonates. He is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Assistant Professor Alison Olcott Marshall - Dr. Olcott Marshall’'s research combines organic geochemical techniques with paleontological and geological techniques, to characterize the evolution and preservation of the biosphere through time, especially in intervals of Earth’'s history where the traditional fossil record is sparse. Dr. Olcott Marshall is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Associate Professor Craig Marshall - Dr. Marshall works with geospectroscopy in carbonate systems. He is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Hubert H. and Kathleen M. Hall Professor of Geology Gene Rankey - Dr. Rankey's research program focuses on understanding and quantifying the nature and controls on variability in surface processes, sedimentology, geomorphic forms, and early diagenesis in modern tropical marine and nearshore carbonate sedimentary systems, including evaluating the impact of global change on Earth-surface processes.  To achieve these goals, his group’s research emphasizes field study of Holocene ramps, rimmed shelves, and isolated platforms, observing both process (waves, tides, etc.), product (biota, sediment and seascapes), remote sensing and GIS analysis of spatial patterns, and computer simulation modeling.   In developing testable conceptual and quantitative models, these studies bear on the origin of the stratigraphic record of carbonate successions and have direct application to prediction in the geologic record, including reservoir analogs.  Dr. Rankey’s experiences also include integration of geologic data with seismic interpretation, seismic modeling, and seismic attribute analysis, from regions including GOM, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, west Texas, offshore Brazil and Canada.  He has also taught classes and short courses in seismic interpretation of carbonate successions, carbonate depositional systems and stratigraphy, oceanography, carbonate reservoir characterization, and field geology. Dr. Rankey is a Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Associate Chair and Associate Professor Jennifer Roberts - Dr. Roberts is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium. Her broad research goals are to:

  • Elucidate the mechanisms by which microorganisms impact precipitation of carbonate minerals in a variety of subsurface conditions ranging from freshwater to shallow marine to deep brine; 
  • Investigate the linkages between mineralogy and microbial ecology and function in subsurface, aqueous environments including tropical soils and permafrost.
  • Demonstrate the fundamental role of bacteria on mineral equilibria in soils and sediments and the environmental and ecological consequences of these processes.

Her current projects include:

  • Microbial Influences on Carbonate Mineral Precipitation
  • Microbially Influences on CO2 Storage and Seal Integrity in Deep Saline Aquifers
  • Biogeophysics: A window into subsurface bioclogging
  • Methanotrophy, Mineral Weathering and Mediation of Methane Flux
  • Microbial participation in silicate weathering and secondary mineral precipitation in acidic hydrothermal environments 

Assistant Professor Randy Stotler - Dr. Stotler works with fluid flow, water-rock interactions, stable isotopes, and lacustrine interface carbonates. He is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.

Associate Professor George Tsoflias - Dr. Tsoflias' work focuses on geophysics, ground penetrating radar, and high resolution seismic imaging of carbonates. He is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Kansas Interdisciplinary Carbonates Consortium.




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